Sunday, July 11, 2010

Spoiled for Choice

Last night, those present in The Star at Lockwood were treated to one of those rare events. A bit like Haleys Comet, or Preston Guild, but probably more satisfying. We had two Mallinsons beers on the bar at the same time!!

First to come on was the 4th in their Viaduct series,'Oxspring DC', a 4.1% beer which I believe is their take on an American IPA and very drinkable it was too. Like most of the brewery's beers it was light and hoppy and packed with flavour, and unfortunately very moreish. Soon it was the only beer that seemed to be going through the pumps.

I must not have been watching very closely though, as another beer ran off and this was replaced by 'Hit for Six' which weighed in at 3.9% and even lighter - a brilliant session bitter. And of course very moreish too - it could have been a very long night!!

Hopefully, both beers will still be on the bar for a further chance to compare and contrast today, but I am not optimistic. The only consolation is that yet another Mally's beer is on the taunting pole so we have 'Wipe Out' to look forward to as well in the next few days, along with a couple of Pictish also waiting in the wings. And all this before the beer festival has even started! It could be a challenging week for local beer drinkers!

7 comments:

Tandleman said...

Hit for Six was rather good at the Ministry of Ale in Burnley last Saturday.

Jibber said...

Not sure about Mallinson's policy of different names for seemingly every brew they make. How many variations on pale and hoppy can you possibly have?

Will said...

Endless I'd imagine. Tweaking the amounts of hops etc used each time in an effort to produce something a little better than last is surely what it's all about. The breweries who stick to the same name even when thay can't get hold of the ingredients of the original recipe are the ones adopting a dodgy policy wouldn't you say?

Anonymous said...

Absolutely Will, if you did a blind taste on Mallinsons beers you would be able to tell the significent difference, it's all in the recipe!!

Anonymous said...

As Will said, endless variations. Plus they are all different beers with different names, not a different beer with the same name brewed because the right hop varieties have run out. I can guarentee to anyone that my beers are all different, come and find me at a beer fest or a hUdds pub and I'll show you my spread sheet. Also I do produce various dark beers, milds, porters and stouts. They have different names too.
Cheers

Tara

Jibber said...

It's just a shame that if you find one that really suits, you may never ever come across it again!

Will said...

That's a good point, but you can't let it outweigh the anticipation you feel every time a new beer appears. They are constantly striving to improve on the last one, consequently you're far more likely to be impressed with each new beer than disappointed. I used to think more than anything that Mallinsons must be a god-send to the ticking fraternity but have since realised that their policy benefits absolutely everyone who enjoys good ale. There can be no room for complacency in the production of beer at this level and this method ensures there isn't.